Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Area dedicata alla discussione sull’Aviazione Militare, gli Aerei, i Reparti e le Basi, le Pattuglie acrobatiche

Moderatore: Staff md80.it

Avatar utente
max70
02000 ft
02000 ft
Messaggi: 295
Iscritto il: 14 aprile 2007, 11:08

Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da max70 » 17 dicembre 2011, 12:26

Secondo quanto riportato da più parti la portaerei cinese (ex-sovietica, ex-ucraina) Riga/Varyag ha cominciato le prove in mare.

Immagine

da: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... cture.html

E' interessante notare che l'unità era stata venduta per essere trasformata in un albergo galleggiante!!! Penso si sia trattato di una di quelle vicende nelle quali tutti sanno che si tratta chiaramente di una bufola ma, per evitare attriti, nessuno lo dice chiaramente.

La notizia più rilevante sta, secondo me, nel fatto che, a quanto pare, l'unità avrà un impiego operativo mentre, fino a qualche tempo fa molti osservatori ipotizzavano si sarebbe trattato solo di una nave da addestramento.

Di certo la Cina ha capacità economiche sufficienti a permetterle la creazione di una forza aerea imbarcata di notevole importanza. Penso che a Taiwan più di qualcuno cominci ad essere preoccupato...
Massimiliano

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 17 dicembre 2011, 14:36

Hanno fatto un bel passo in avanti ma è una portaerei con ski jump e mi sembra abbia poco spazio a bordo..opinione del tutto personale sia chiaro, ma sono scettico sull'efficacia di una nave di quelle dimensioni e con a bordo una manciata di aerei (per quanto siano dei su33)...

Avatar utente
giragyro
10000 ft
10000 ft
Messaggi: 1439
Iscritto il: 21 luglio 2011, 15:59
Località: alessandria

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da giragyro » 17 dicembre 2011, 19:33

Nel breve medio periodo prevedono l entrata in servizio di altre due unita' , per un totale di tre gruppi di battaglia destinati ad operare lungo le coste africane , pacifiche ed indiane a protezione delle zone con forti interessi cinesi. Aveva ragione kissinger mi sa quando piuttosto che l'orso sovietico additava come pericoloso competitor il "pericolo giallo "
Argo riconobbe Ulisse, Penelope no.

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 17 dicembre 2011, 21:01

@ max70
Penso che a Taiwan più di qualcuno cominci ad essere preoccupato .....
Infatti stanno già correndo ai ripari .....

Immagine

Immagine
Fonte: AviationWeek.com

Taiwan Points to Own Carrier-Killer Missile

By Leithen Francis - Taipei (Aug 11, 2011)


Taiwan’s ministry of national defense (MND) caused a sensation during the preview of the 2011 Taipei Aerospace and Defense Technology Exhibition by displaying a billboard depicting an aircraft carrier, similar to China’s ex-Varyag, being blown up by a Taiwanese Hsiung Feng III anti-ship cruise missile.

It is very unusual for the Taiwanese to so blatantly highlight that its weapons are aimed at China, says one industry analyst, adding that the decision to use a Varyag image in the advertisement may have been an unintended mistake.

The Hsiung Feng III, which was developed by MND’s Chung Shan International Institute of Science and Technology, has only been shown in a public forum twice before, says an official from the institute speaking to Aviation Week on the sidelines of the show.

The missile is designed to penetrate an aircraft carrier and explode inside to cause maximum damage. The institute claims it only takes one or two of these missiles to sink an aircraft carrier.

Taiwan unveiled the missile to the general public the same day that China’s first aircraft carrier, the once-Soviet Varyag, set sale Aug. 10.

Taiwan’s defenses are focused on the island’s west coast, facing the Taiwan Strait and China, but the concern is that an aircraft carrier could be used to attack Taiwan’s east coast.
Immagine

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 17 dicembre 2011, 21:13

Inoltre .....
Fonte: Aviation Week and Space Technology

What Carrier Means In China Military Plans

By Bradley Perrett - Beijing (Aug 17, 2011)


The Chinese military is either confident that it can already win a battle in the Taiwan Strait, or it is confident that it can keep winning the budget battles back in Beijing.

With the ex-Soviet carrier Varyag now mobile near the northern port of Dalian, China has joined the aircraft carrier club. And in completing the ship, with its limited use in narrow waters, the country has left behind one of the guiding principles of its defense acquisitions—that the first priority after nuclear deterrence is subjugating Taiwan.

Partly for that reason, the long-awaited appearance of the 67,500-ton vessel, symbolic of the country’s rising economic and military strength, has stoked anxieties across Asia as far as India. Beijing’s response: Other countries should just get used to the fact that China is developing carrier aviation.

As if to underline the doubtful value of an aircraft carrier in an attempt to force Taiwanese reunification with the mainland, a Hsiung Feng III missile was promoted as a “carrier killer” at the Taipei Aerospace and Defense Technology Exhibition just as the Varyag headed to sea for the first time (see p. 26).

The ship, which will soon get a Chinese name and is officially earmarked for training pilots and deck crews, left Dalian on Aug. 10 for its sea trials, in which the builder will show that the ship meets specifications.

The investment in Varyag shows that the Chinese military is moving beyond its decades-old obsession with seizing Taiwan, says security researcher Ashley Townshend of the Lowy Institute in Sydney. “An aircraft carrier does not seem to be necessary for that,” he says, noting the land-based firepower that China can bring to bear on the island. “This means there is less focus,” he says.

So the carrier program could mean that China thinks it already has the pieces in place to secure the strait and bring Taiwan to heel. The alternative, which seems more likely, is that while the armed forces reckon much more military power is needed to force Taiwanese reunification—and to persuade the U.S. to keep out of the fight—they expect that future funding will be enough to do that and more.

Completing Varyag is unlikely to be just a one-time divergence from the focus on Taiwan, since three carriers will probably be needed to ensure that one is always available, Townshend argues. Reports of China building carriers from scratch have appeared from time to time over the years. The Washington Times ­cited unnamed U.S. defense officials this month as saying that construction of a Varyag-like carrier had begun.

Varyag’s long-awaited appearance raises two questions that have been asked repeatedly since China towed the hull to the shipyard at Dalian in 2002 with the evident intent of using it, somehow, to introduce fixed-wing aviation at sea. When will China have an operational carrier, usable as a fighting ship, and not just as a training ship? And why does China want carrier aviation anyway?

“When the ship will be operational is anyone’s guess,” says Townshend. It depends a lot on what level of competence the Chinese will demand before regarding the ship as deployable, he points out.

Taking a stab, analyst Richard Bitzinger of Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University says: “It will probably be at least five years before there’s an operational capability.”

There is a strong clue that the Chinese navy does not expect to take too long in learning the notoriously difficult and dangerous business of efficiently operating fixed-wing aircraft at sea. For many years while Varyag was in dockyard hands, it was unclear how much effort would be spent on the ship, and how far it would be transformed from the empty hull that Chinese businessmen bought from Ukraine in 1998. It was conceivable, for example, that Varyag might have been made only structurally fit for service as a moored hull that pilots and deck crews could practice on. Or it might have been cheaply fitted with a modest powerplant and not much else, confining it to training excursions.

But as the ship runs its trials, it is evident that the navy has gone for the whole box and dice. Varyag has been fitted for combat—with self-defense surface-to-air missile launchers, a profusion of domes that must cover antennas for communications systems and sensors and, most notably, a phased-array radar. To integrate those systems, a capable command system must be installed deep in the hull. It seems unlikely that a navy that expected to take, say, 10 years to prepare the ship for combat would spend so heavily now on such costly equipment, especially since better systems would be available later.

It is also clear that China has not skimped on propulsion. Thick exhaust from the funnel during engine tests indicates that Varyag is not fitted with the gas turbines that Western and Japanese navies now routinely use for fast ships—and yet the exhaust color is too light for diesel propulsion, a heavy but inexpensive and efficient choice commonly made for ships of moderate speed. Diesels were an alternative that Chinese builders, expert in merchant ship construction, could easily have executed had the navy not wanted much speed, says U.S. Naval War College Prof. Andrew Erickson.

So the installation—reportedly built with Ukrainian help—is evidently a powerful steam-turbine plant, matched to the high-speed lines of the hull. Varyag’s sister ship, the Russian Kuznetsov, has a 147,000-kw (197,000-hp) steam-turbine plant that propels the ship at about 30 kt., compared with the 25-plus kt. officially stated for the two otherwise comparable ships that Britain is building. U.S. carriers are capable of more than 30 kt.

Erickson stresses the value of speed to a ship that, like Varyag, has a deck configuration requiring aircraft to use the mode of operation known as short takeoff but arrested recovery (Stobar). “Given the limitations of Stobar on aircraft weight, the more wind over the deck the better,” he says.

The Stobar configuration uses a ski jump instead of catapults. One of many British inventions that have made aircraft carriers workable, the ski jump effectively extends the flight deck into the air ahead of the ship. As aircraft hurtle off the ramp, they are not fast enough to fly, but their upward trajectory gives them time to accelerate before hitting the water. The energy from a catapult, however, allows greater weight—and therefore payload-radius.

The combat aircraft that will eventually appear on the Varyag will be the J-15, a Flanker version similar to, and maybe reverse engineered from, the Russian Su-33 naval fighter. Adapted for ski-jump takeoffs, it features canard wings and complex trailing-edge surfaces (AW&ST May 9, p. 35).

Like Kuznetsov, the operational Varyag may carry 40 or so aircraft, compared with more than 60 on U.S. carriers. The flight decks of the 102,000-ton U.S. Nimitz class ships measure 333 X 77 meters (1,092 X 252 ft.), compared with Kuznetsov’s 305 X 70 meters.

Limited payload-radius and other shortcomings would put Varyag at a disadvantage in action against a U.S. carrier, but such a battle must be the last thing on the mind of the Chinese navy. It seems likely that China expects to deploy its carriers in much the same way that the U.S. Navy, whatever its hot-war plans, has actually deployed its flat-tops during the past 60 years: as power-projection tools against enemies that could not hope to sink the huge ships, surrounded as they are by anti-air and anti-submarine escorts.

While Varyag and follow-on carriers would be helpful in intimidating rivals to China’s claims on the South China Sea, analysts Erickson, Bitzinger and Townshend agree that the most likely reason for China to build aircraft carriers is probably not far from the vague justification that the country is offering: Lots of other nations have them.

Aircraft carriers have proven useful to other countries. Moreover, China is a rising power, with a long view of history. It will want carrier aviation eventually, so it might as well start working on it. The reasoning is that “a rich nation should have strong armed forces,” says Bitzinger, who also thinks the ships would have some role against Taiwan.


Avatar utente
max70
02000 ft
02000 ft
Messaggi: 295
Iscritto il: 14 aprile 2007, 11:08

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da max70 » 18 dicembre 2011, 11:46

MatteF88 ha scritto:Hanno fatto un bel passo in avanti ma è una portaerei con ski jump e mi sembra abbia poco spazio a bordo...
Di certo non è una classe Nimitz, comunque si tratta, praticamente, di una "copia" della Kuznetov russa e dovrebbe poter imbarcare una quarantina di aerei.

Immagine

Questa foto è fortissima :wink: , grazie richelieu!!! D'altronde leggevo che tra i nomi proposti per la portaerei c'è quello di un ammirgaglio che ne medioevo conquistò Taiwan, quindi l'mmagine artistica del missile è giustificata!!!

Penso che in una eventuale azione contro Taiwan la portaerei sarebbe utile più che in azioni dirette contro l'isola ribelle (ampiamente alla portata di forze basate a terra), per contribuire a creare una sorta di "zona di quarantena" o "blocco" attorno la zona d'operazioni.
Massimiliano

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 18 dicembre 2011, 12:39

Assolutamente, concordo in pieno! :wink: ..quello che mi lascia perplesso è il valore strategico di una portaerei di quel tipo..se serve solo per mostrare i muscoli nelle zone dove l'influenza cinese è in aumento ok...altrimenti mi sembra limitata come scelta..[per dire: non puó imbarcare aerei radar come fa la charles de gaulle (che non è una nimitz) con gli e2, oppure per dirla in maniera piú generale, avrà un gruppo imbarcato monotipo montato su su33 che anche se sono multiruolo non sono in grado di fare "tutto"]
Domanda: il fatto di non avere catapulte influisce sul peso max al decollo (carburante e armi)?

Avatar utente
max70
02000 ft
02000 ft
Messaggi: 295
Iscritto il: 14 aprile 2007, 11:08

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da max70 » 18 dicembre 2011, 14:07

Come hai intuito il decollo da ski jump implica limitazioni di peso massimo.

Credo che, potendo scegliere, la configurazione CATOBAR (catapulte per il lancio e cavi di arresto) garantisca il massimo dell'efficienza; in effetti la scelta STOBAR (decollo "autonomo e recupero con cavi) mi pare molto poco azzeccata: gli aerei devono comunque essere irrobbustiti per resistere alle decelerazioni imposte dall'arresto a mezzo dei cavi, però dato il decollo autonomo hanno limitazioni nel peso massimo al lancio. Non è un caso che le unità STOBAR sono pochissime: solo quelle di derivazione russa.
Questa soluzione permette però di evitare l'installazione delle catapulte la cui realizzazione non è proprio elementare; inoltre per funzionare le catapulte necessitano di vapore (salvo le future macchine elettromagnetiche) che comunque sulle Kuznestov dovrebbe essere disponibile dato che la propulsione è, appunto, su turbine a vapore (e da quanto riportato nell'articolo postato da richelieu non sembra che i cinesi abbiano modificato tale impianto).

Per quanto riguarda il gruppo imbarcato c'è da rilevare che, per ora, i cinesi avrebbero un "monotipo" (anche se di qualità ecellente). Tuttavia l'aviazione imbarcata è agli esordi in Cina e la nave, che nonostante gli impieghi operativi avrà certamente una funzione importante per l'addestramento e la ricerca potrebbe, potenzialmente accogliere un gruppo più completo.

I russi avevano una versione imbarcata del Su25 (anche se usata come addestratore), inoltre era stato previsto un E2 sovietico: lo yak44:
Immagine

che era stato scelto sul più originale An71:

Immagine

Mi pare che entrambe i modelli erano stati pensati per operare da ordo della Kuznestov che comunque, per ora svolge il ruolo AEW grazie agli elicotteri Ka31 (che mi sembra siano stati venduti anche ai cinesi).

Immagine
Massimiliano

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 18 dicembre 2011, 14:48

Grazie max70! :wink: Non avevo mai sentito parlare dello yak44 (interessanti quelle eliche controrotanti a scimitarra! Sbaglio o le eliche a scimitarra sono state introdotte, in occidente, piú tardi?), mentre avevo visto le foto dell'an71 ma non pensavo fosse stato proposto per il ruolo imbarcato viste le dimensioni imponenti. :shock: ..son russi.. :mrgreen:

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 18 dicembre 2011, 23:12

@ max70
Per quanto riguarda il gruppo imbarcato c'è da rilevare che, per ora, i cinesi avrebbero un "monotipo" (anche se di qualità ecellente).
Veramente ..... c'è chi non la pensa così ..... anche, e sopratutto, perchè si tratta di parte in causa ..... :wink:
"The Chinese J-15 clone is unlikely to achieve the same performance characteristics of the Russian Su-33 carrier-based fighter, and I do not rule out the possibility that China could return to negotiations with Russia on the purchase of a substantial batch of Su-33s"
Fonte ..... risalente però allo scorso anno .... http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20100604/159306694.html

Inoltre .....
Fonte: Aviationweek.com

New Chinese Ship-Based Fighter Progresses

By David A. Fulghum (Apr. 28, 2011)


Beijing is revealing pictures of its Shenyang J-15 Flying Shark design that is intended to populate the decks of its first aircraft carrier.

The J-15 is based on the J-11B, Shenyang’s unlicensed and indigenously adapted version of the Sukhoi Su-27 Flanker, and resembles its Russian equivalent, the Su-33 shipboard version, with a foreplane, folding wings, arrester hook and reinforced landing gear. Like the Su-33, the J-15 is designed to take off from a ski jump rather than a catapult. There are some differences from the Su-33, including more complex trailing-edge flaps and advanced Chinese avionics.

The unlicensed adaptation has been a source of friction with Moscow, says Douglas Barrie, senior fellow for military aerospace with London’s International Institute for Strategic Studies.

The J-15’s canards replicate those on the Su-33, indicating its flight control system is at least similar, Barrie says. Moreover, “a mock-up of the J-15 was seen carrying a dummy anti-ship missile, suggesting the J-15 may be intended to have a strike role from the outset, while the Su-33 was an air-to-air design.”

The heavy shipborne fighter will be yet another piece in the foundation of a ship-based force that can project power at sea, far from China’s shore defenses. They are expected to be first based on the former Russian Varyag aircraft carrier. The first pictures were taken at Shenyang Aircraft Industry Corp.’s No. 112 factory.

The design features exterior missile rails and a wide-angle holographic head-up display similar to those on the company’s J-11 fighter.

There are competing claims about the aircraft’s capability. Russian’s Ria Novosti news service called it inferior to the Su-33, but Chinese officials say the Su-33’s avionics are obsolete, so they have installed locally made sensors, displays and weaponry.

While based structurally on the Su-33, the aircraft features avionics — including an advanced anti-ship radar — from the J-11B program. Deployment is expected no earlier than 2016.

Analysts and aircraft watchers in China say the aircraft’s first flight was made on Aug. 31, 2009, powered by a Russian-supplied AL-31. Ukraine is the source of China’s Su-33/Flanker D, U.S. analysts agree.

“Russia’s carrier training is done in Ukraine at Saki, and for years there was one of the first prototype Su-33s sitting there,” one of the analysts says. “It disappeared a few years ago and likely ended up in China. The most recent photos of the J-15 show that they are either already entering low-rate initial production or close to it. I expect these [LRIP aircraft] to move to the training facilities soon and begin the long road to carrier qualification.”

The first takeoff from a simulated ski jump was conducted on May 6, 2010.

The program began after a Su-33 prototype was acquired from Ukraine in 2001. China offered to buy Su-33s from Russia as recently as 2009.

A Ukrainian court convicted a Russian man in February of conspiring to give the Chinese details of a Crimean air base that had been used to train Su-33 pilots to take off from a carrier’s ski jump ramp, according to the New York Times.

In Huludao, a navy installation on China’s northeast coast, workers are said to have built a rough clone of the Crimea test center, complete with a ski ramp for short takeoffs.

“There are lots of photos of a [dry, ground-based] carrier training facility that has a static flight deck for crew training,” the U.S. analyst says. “The facility is shaped like a carrier, with the dormitories and classrooms below the flight deck. It already has both a Flanker mock-up and a helicopter [onboard] to qualify deck and maintenance crews for carrier operations. Another facility at Xian has the ski jump for carrier takeoffs and the arresting gear network for landings. We expect to see these J-15s do a lot of work there.”

Taiwan intelligence officials say the aircraft carrier — thought to be slated for a training role — could make its first voyage by the end of the year.

The warship has been docked in China’s eastern Dalian harbor, where it has undergone extensive refurbishing since 2002.

“The carrier is also interesting in that it appears to be fitted with a close-in [Club-type cruise missile] weapons system,” Barrie says.

U.S. intelligence analysts agree with the Taiwanese officials. “Just last month we started seeing the powerplants firing up, showing they are getting really close to going to sea trials sometime this year, [perhaps] as soon as this summer,” the U.S. analyst says. “They’ve also discussed a second carrier [indigenously built] using the knowledge gained from their work on the one they bought from the Russians.”

Immagine

Avatar utente
max70
02000 ft
02000 ft
Messaggi: 295
Iscritto il: 14 aprile 2007, 11:08

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da max70 » 21 dicembre 2011, 21:44

Non avevo idea dei dubbi circa le capacità del J15.

Interessante questo:
Moreover, “a mock-up of the J-15 was seen carrying a dummy anti-ship missile, suggesting the J-15 may be intended to have a strike role from the outset, while the Su-33 was an air-to-air design.”
Massimiliano

Avatar utente
mach789i
Rullaggio
Rullaggio
Messaggi: 23
Iscritto il: 9 dicembre 2011, 18:47

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da mach789i » 29 dicembre 2011, 17:59

MatteF88 ha scritto:Assolutamente, concordo in pieno! :wink: ..quello che mi lascia perplesso è il valore strategico di una portaerei di quel tipo..se serve solo per mostrare i muscoli nelle zone dove l'influenza cinese è in aumento ok...altrimenti mi sembra limitata come scelta..[per dire: non puó imbarcare aerei radar come fa la charles de gaulle (che non è una nimitz) con gli e2, oppure per dirla in maniera piú generale, avrà un gruppo imbarcato monotipo montato su su33 che anche se sono multiruolo non sono in grado di fare "tutto"]
Domanda: il fatto di non avere catapulte influisce sul peso max al decollo (carburante e armi)?
quando si parla dei cinesi bisogna sempre pensare che loro non lavorano per l'oggi o per il domani prossimo..... i loro tempi sono ampi, molto dilatati, ma piano piano crescono e arrivano dove vogliono.
se è vero che anni fa Ciu En Lai ad un giornalista che gli chiedeva della Rivoluzione Francese ha risposto "è ancora troppo presto per dare un giudizio...."
la dice lunga
Cuba se desarolla!

Avatar utente
Vultur
10000 ft
10000 ft
Messaggi: 1347
Iscritto il: 16 ottobre 2011, 13:28

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da Vultur » 29 dicembre 2011, 22:50

Per il decollo da skijump, ammesso che abbiano limitazioni, credo che gli convenga decollare a secco di carburante e poi rifornirsi in volo subito dopo.

Quella dell'albergo galleggiante credo che riguardasse non la Kuznetsov, ma i più "piccoli" inctrociatori portaeromobili classe Kiev dei quali il Minsk mi pare che è finito per davvero a fare il parco giochi in Cina.

Come impressione generale e dall'alto della mia grande esperienza direi che come nave mi pare più un mezzo per fare pratica operativa di aviazione navale.
Innanzi tutto la Kuznetsov non è a propulsione nucleare, per cui NON ha autonomia praticamente illimitata. Quindi il suo impiego non mi pare effettivamente strategico a livello globale.
Inoltre date le dimensioni (relativamente piccole) e il tipo di propulsione, le sue scorte di armi e carburante, nonchè pezzi di ricambio, saranno probabilmente assai ridotte. Da non dimenticare che fu costruita in epoca sovietica, quando il fatto di sbandierare portaerei simili a quelle americane passava davanti a tutto il resto e quindi anche a considerazioni riguardo l'effettiva operatività e convenienza del sistema: cioè erano navi fatte soprattutto per ideologia, più che per altro. Questo forse potrebbe limitare la reale efficacia di queste navi.
Inoltre lo stormo aereo imbarcato avrebbe quali aerei? I Su-33? I quali dovrebbero fate tutto. Sono sicuro che ne sono più che in grado, ma mi sembra un po' una forzatura.
L'An-71 non penso proprio che possa entrare in una portaerei; non in una portaerei che conosco io per lo meno. Lo danno alto nove metri, con 32 metri di ala: dove lo mettono?
Lo Yak-44 non è stato prodotto in serie. Forse lo metteranno in produzione i cinesi, o forse usano gli elicotteri come AEW.
Ma il ruolo di bombardiere chi lo fa? Sempre il SU-33, o una versione navale del SU-30MK.
In ogni caso gli servirà di sicuro per fare pratica. Sono certo che hanno già messo per lo meno sulla carta una nuova serie di portaerei tutta loro.

ELTAR
05000 ft
05000 ft
Messaggi: 755
Iscritto il: 30 settembre 2008, 18:29
Località: Near ELTAR

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da ELTAR » 29 dicembre 2011, 23:54

Un pò come la Cavour insomma...
Ho pianto, ho riso... Ho fatto scelte sbagliate, altre giuste... Sono amico di molti, voglio bene a pochi, non odio nessuno... Parlo poco ma dico sempre quello che penso... Qualcuno mi vuole bene, altri mi detestano... Pazienza è la vita!

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 30 dicembre 2011, 10:24

Vultur ha scritto:.
L'An-71 non penso proprio che possa entrare in una portaerei; non in una portaerei che conosco io per lo meno. Lo danno alto nove metri, con 32 metri di ala: dove lo mettono?
Lo Yak-44 non è stato prodotto in serie. Forse lo metteranno in produzione i cinesi, o forse usano gli elicotteri come AEW.
.
Se puó interessare : http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... /an-71.htm

In sintesi, pensavano di modificare l'an71 per renderlo compatibile ma rinunciarono
In questa foto (che sembra "rubata") Si vede una quella che potrebbe essere una possibile configurazione di un ipotetico aew&c imbarcato cinese.(il condizionale credo sia d'obbligo in quanto non so quanto sia autorevole la fonte che ha riportato questa foto) :wink:
http://globalmilitaryreview.blogspot.co ... model.html

Hartmann
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10617
Iscritto il: 7 marzo 2007, 9:44

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da Hartmann » 30 dicembre 2011, 10:30

Io credo abbiano comprato la tecnologia più che la nave. Del tipo "fammi vedere com'è che poi me ne faccio 100 uguali"


Leggo ed aggiungo

http://www.corriere.it/esteri/11_dicemb ... 83b7.shtml

Avatar utente
Vultur
10000 ft
10000 ft
Messaggi: 1347
Iscritto il: 16 ottobre 2011, 13:28

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da Vultur » 30 dicembre 2011, 11:49

MatteF88 ha scritto:
In sintesi, pensavano di modificare l'an71 per renderlo compatibile ma rinunciarono
In questa foto (che sembra "rubata") Si vede una quella che potrebbe essere una possibile configurazione di un ipotetico aew&c imbarcato cinese.(il condizionale credo sia d'obbligo in quanto non so quanto sia autorevole la fonte che ha riportato questa foto) :wink:
http://globalmilitaryreview.blogspot.co ... model.html
La foto mi sembra si riferisca a un E-2 Hawkeye abbandonato da qualche parte; dalla livrea direi che era israeliano.

L'An-71 a bordo non ho idea di dove lo mettessero, a meno di non avere hangar alti 9 metri. Non so che ci volessero fare i sovietici, ma c'è uno scassatissimo An-72 dalle mie parti e a me sembra veramente un aereo un tantino "grosso" per lavorarci da una portaerei, specie se senza catapulte.

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 30 dicembre 2011, 11:57

Infatti come hai potuto leggere nel link l'an71 è una versione accorciata dell'an72 e per poterlo imbarcare avrebbero dovuto modificarlo ulteriormente...rinunciarono a favore dello yak44 che poi non entró in produzione

Avatar utente
max70
02000 ft
02000 ft
Messaggi: 295
Iscritto il: 14 aprile 2007, 11:08

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da max70 » 31 dicembre 2011, 16:50

Vultur ha scritto: Quella dell'albergo galleggiante credo che riguardasse non la Kuznetsov, ma i più "piccoli" inctrociatori portaeromobili classe Kiev dei quali il Minsk mi pare che è finito per davvero a fare il parco giochi in Cina.
L'unità cinese non è la Kuznetsov (che fa parte della attuale flotta russa) bensì la sua gemella Varyag, mai ultimata, e venduta ai cinesi proprio come casinò/albergo galleggiante.
Conferme puoi trovarle facilmente in rete, ad esempio vedi qui http://the-diplomat.com/new-leaders-for ... and-trust/ dove si dice:
Consistent with previous Chinese purchases of aircraft carriers, Chong Lot claimed that the Varyag would be converted into a floating entertainment centre and casino in Macau
Il fatto che la propulsione nucleare assicuri una autonomia quasi illimitata non è il motivo che fa scegliere questa configurazione: essenzialmente sono le dimensioni a fare propendere per il nucleare (per le navi di superfice... i sommergibili sono tutta un'altra faccenda!) unita a considerazioni di ordine economico (nucleare costa molto).
Massimiliano

Avatar utente
Vultur
10000 ft
10000 ft
Messaggi: 1347
Iscritto il: 16 ottobre 2011, 13:28

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da Vultur » 31 dicembre 2011, 18:41

Non sapevo che la Varyag l'avessero acquistata dicendo di farne un casinò, ma il Minsk a fare il parco giochi c'è finito di sicuro.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minsk_World

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 30 luglio 2012, 9:06

L'AEW&C imbarcato? Anche se gli manca ancora qualcosa...
Images have emerged on various Chinese defence websites of what appears to be a testbed for a possible carrier-borne airborne early warning & control (AEW&C) aircraft.
The aircraft, apparently designated JZY-01, is based on the Xian Y-7 transport, the Chinese version of the Antonov An-26. A rough translation of the Chinese characters on the fuselage reads "demonstrator aircraft."

The two most notable features are a large circular radar dome mounted on a single mast aft of the wing root. It is unclear whether this is an operational radome, or a mock-up for testing aerodynamics.

The aircraft's tail has been highly modified and resembles the four vertical stabilizer arrangement found on the world's only carrier-capable fixed-wing AEW&C aircraft - the Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye. Having four vertical stabilizers allows the E-2 to fit inside an aircraft carrier's hangar deck.


Notably, the JZY-01 appears to lack a tail hook, an essential piece of equipment for a carrier-borne aircraft. In addition, the landing gear would need to be heavily modified for carrier operations, and there is no indication the wings can fold.

China is conducting sea trials of a 60,000 tonne aircraft carrier that formerly served Russia as the Varyag. This ship, however, would be unable to support operations by large AEW&C aircraft because it relies on a 'ski-ramp' to launch aircraft. This limits fixed-wing operations to jet powered fighters, such as the Sukhoi Su-33 or China's Shenyang J-15.

The existence of the JZY-01 could suggest that China eventually intends to develop aircraft carriers equipped with steam or electro-magnetic catapults.
Immagine
Immagine

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ed-374858/

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 26 settembre 2012, 18:05

E' stata consegnata la "Liaoning", cioè la portaerei...dovranno poi iniziare i test con i velivoli a bordo (J-15, elicotteri AEW&C e suppongo anche gli ASW..)
http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... er-376932/


Cina 1-0 India :|

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 27 settembre 2012, 20:46

Il bello deve ancora venire ..... :mrgreen:
The Calm Before the Storm .....

China's about to find out how hard it is to run an aircraft carrier.
Fonte ..... http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2 ... _the_storm


Immagine
"The 'Liaoning' on Sept. 25, festooned with flags for its commissioning ceremony."


Immagine
"Chinese president Hu Jintao attended the commissioning ceremony for the Liaoning on Sept. 25.
In this still from video broadcast on Chinese state television, he stands on the ship's bridge with military officials. "

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 28 settembre 2012, 9:25

Infatti .....
China denies reports of second aircraft carrier .....

China has dismissed reports that it will launch a second aircraft carrier later this year, as it recognises the challenges involved with fixed-wing flight operations at sea.
Fonte ..... http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... er-377034/

:mrgreen:

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 25 novembre 2012, 9:32

Novità dalla Cina ..... la Marina stringe i tempi .....
China's first carrier conducts flight trials with J-15 Flying Shark fighters .....

China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) appears to have taken a major step forward with conducting flight operations on its first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning.
Fonte ..... http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... ducts.html


Immagine

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 25 novembre 2012, 18:41

Una gallery di eccellenti immagini .....

http://news.xinhuanet.com/mil/2012-11/2 ... 998037.htm

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 25 novembre 2012, 19:03

É un impressione mia o le derive del J-15 hanno la parte superiore meno "inclinata" (oppure, piú orizzontale) rispetto al Su-33 originale :roll:

hawk-eyed
FL 150
FL 150
Messaggi: 1573
Iscritto il: 13 aprile 2010, 17:39

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da hawk-eyed » 25 novembre 2012, 19:52

e qui un video interessante a riguardo :

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-20484592

:wink:
Immagine

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 25 novembre 2012, 20:40

MatteF88 ha scritto:É un impressione mia o le derive del J-15 hanno la parte superiore meno "inclinata" (oppure, piú orizzontale) rispetto al Su-33 originale :roll:
Difficile a dirsi ..... :dontknow:

Immagine

Immagine

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 25 novembre 2012, 20:49

Devo essermi fatto ingannare dalla prospettiva delle diverse immagini :wink: :mrgreen:
Immagine


Ps: le prime serie di Su-27 avevano però effettivamente le parti superiori più inclinate...é una caratteristica che poi si é persa negli ultimi modelli..ma qui si rischia di sovrapporsi al thread dedicato :mrgreen:

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 25 novembre 2012, 20:55

Altra immagine .....

Immagine

..... e chiudiamo l' OT .....

:wink:

Avatar utente
Vultur
10000 ft
10000 ft
Messaggi: 1347
Iscritto il: 16 ottobre 2011, 13:28

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da Vultur » 26 novembre 2012, 9:48

Flying Shark? Boh gusti cinesi....

Qualcosa di diverso esternamente mi pare ce l'ha: wingtip con piloni modificati per il modernissimo Python3 di Pace in Galilea, ma perchè i cinesi hanno armi israeliane mentre il mondo è avvolto da crisi economica? Boh

I SU-33 tra le altre cose hanno pure il parafango anteriore modificato (ridotto), forse perchè il ponte di volo è più pulito di una pista a terra. Avionica e motori dovrebbero essere tutti cinesi, dato che gli aerei ucraini in origine ne erano privi.

Quel giallo squallido era proprio necessario sul mare? E' solo l'anticorrosione? O forse si staglia meglio contro il blu durante le riprese. Gusti cinesi.

Avatar utente
MatteF88
FL 350
FL 350
Messaggi: 3800
Iscritto il: 6 dicembre 2011, 18:57

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da MatteF88 » 26 novembre 2012, 9:57

Direi proprio che il giallo é ovviamente provvisorio, magari gli fa comodo per i test per avere parti più visibili...chi é che va in guerra con un aereo giallo sabbia (a meno della desert storm) ?!?! Vedrai che gli daranno qualche mano di vernice di un colore più consono alla vita sul mare... :wink:

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 26 novembre 2012, 10:22

Un breve articolo ed un commento dal sito di "Flight International" .....
China starts flight operations from first aircraft carrier .....

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... er-379416/
IN FOCUS: Long march ahead for Chinese naval airpower .....

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... er-379419/

Avatar utente
richelieu
FL 500
FL 500
Messaggi: 10179
Iscritto il: 22 dicembre 2008, 21:14

Re: Prove in mare per la prima portaerei cinese.

Messaggio da richelieu » 26 novembre 2012, 17:48

"Una dimostrazione di forza" ..... così vengono definite le prove in mare del caccia cinese J-15 dall'agenzia giornalistica "Reuters" citata da "Aviation Week & Space Technology" .....
China Lands Fighter Jet On New Carrier In Show Of Force .....

China has carried out its first successful landing of a fighter jet on its first aircraft carrier, state media said on Sunday, a symbolically significant development as Asian neighbours fret about the world’s most populous country’s military ambitions.

http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.asp ... 520718.xml

Rispondi